Antoine Peak Loop

Named after French-Canadian voyageur and ferry operator Antoine Plante, the Antoine Peak Conservation Area was established in 2007 and covers more than 1,000 acres. The loop trail ascends the almost 3,400-foot peak, offering sweeping views across the Spokane valley, Liberty Lake, and the distant Selkirk and Coeur d’Alene Mountains.

Location Selkirk Mountains
Rating 2.5 out of 5
Difficulty Moderate
Distance 9.3 miles
Duration 3:17 hours moving time (snowshoeing)
Elevation Gain 1,318 feet
High Point 3,391 feet (Antoine Peak)
Low Point 2,233 feet (Trailhead)
Trail Type Loop
Trailbed Fire roads
Water A few brooks, but likely seasonal, and Leland Pond.
Status Conservation Area
Administration Spokane County
Conditions Excellent
Permits None required
Camping Not allowed
Maps USGS Greenacres
Trailhead Take I-90 exit #296 and head north on Harvard Road for 2.5 miles. Take a left (west) on Trent. After a mile turn right onto Campbell Road. After 1.6 miles turn left onto Lincoln Road (this intersection is at the point Campbell turns into a gravel road). Follow Lincoln for .5 miles. The parking lot will be on your left, just past Mitchell Road.

Google Directions (47.729159, -117.143056)

Season Year-around
Squirrel Density Fabulous
Features Mountaintop, Lake
Distance From
  • Coeur d’Alene 22.0 miles
  • Lewiston 121.5 miles
  • Sandpoint 57.0 miles
  • Seattle 295.8 miles
  • Spokane 17.9 miles
Resources
Nearby Hikes
Date March 11, 2017

TrailheadAntoine Peak is covered with a web of old logging or fire roads, and the hiking trail system on the mountain largely takes advantage of that. This guide follows the trails in a counterclockwise fashion, then loops around and contours along the southern flank for a figure-eight-style loop.

Leland PondTo start, follow the old logging road going north, paralleling Lincoln Road for a while, then veering away and shifting northwest, then westwards, to reach Leland Pond after roughly a mile. Leaving the pond behind, the trail moves sharply northwards, climbs steadily and leads to an intersection. You could go either way, the left branch is the shorter, and the right leads almost to the edge of the conservation area, then turns in a giant switchback (nice views at this point towards the east) that turns straight south and rejoins the first branch just before the 3-mile mark.

The logging road steadily climbs as it ascends the ridge, which is reached at the 3-mile mark. This spot indulges with the first views to the south, including Liberty Lake. The trail then follows the ridge to an unnamed knoll and traverses the saddle to the base of Antoine Peak.

Approaching the peakA single track departs from the logging road and ascends the peak in a set of switchbacks, then climbs more or less in a straight line. About halfway to the peak, the trail spills onto another old logging road, which it follows northwards at a very manageable incline, only to depart once again and climbing the remainder to the peak in a straight line.

Several antennas "grace" the top of Antoine PeakThe views from the antenna-studded top are sweeping. To the east you can see well into Idaho, to the south you have Mica Peak, Liberty Lake, Tower Mountain and the Spokane industrial park. To the north is the Selkirk crest.

Rock formationsThe trail leads across the top, amongst antenna masts, and heads down the far side. While snowshoes were necessary on the way up the eastern side, they became less and less required on the western side. The trail continues along the ridge, steadily losing altitude, and at the 5-mile mark intersects with another logging road that skirts the southern side of Antoine Peak.

This road was almost entirely snow free. It more or less contours along the mountain, at first declining, then rising again (once you reach the power lines; make sure to stay to the north of the power lines). After 2 miles the trail rejoins the original path at the base of Antoine Peak.

The last bit of trail is a single-trackRetrace your steps along the inbound trail, across the saddle and down the ridge to the point where you’d originally reached the ridge. Instead of turning left, go straight and downhill along the ridge. At some point the trail will u-turn, moving westwards a bit along a logging road, then drop off to the right in form of a single track. The single track leads lower while once again curling around the mountain in a southerly direction, then hits upon another old logging road going northeast, which brings you back to the parking lot.

Enjoy this hike? Let us know in the comments below!

Trailhead
Trailhead
Naughty racing
Naughty racing
Leland Pond
Leland Pond
Still enough snow to wear snowshoes
Still enough snow to wear snowshoes
Conservation area boundary
Conservation area boundary
View towards Idaho
View towards Idaho
The area is lightly forested
The area is lightly forested
View south
View south
Approaching the peak
Approaching the peak
Several antennas "grace" the top of Antoine Peak
Several antennas “grace” the top of Antoine Peak
View north
View north
Liberty Lake
Liberty Lake
Spokane river and industrial area
Spokane river and industrial area
Turning point: far western point
Turning point: far western point
Rock formations
Rock formations
Some didnt make it out alive, and Naughty had nothing to do with it…
Some didn’t make it out alive, and Naughty had nothing to do with it…
Bear left (uphill) and stay north of the power lines
Bear left (uphill) and stay north of the power lines
Trail leading back to junction
Trail leading back to junction
The last bit of trail is a single-track
The last bit of trail is a single-track
Trailmap
Alternate Routes

  • An alternate access point is to the west on Robbins Road (limited parking)
  • Refer to the trailmap for additional trails and/or shortcuts


© 2016 – 2017 NaughtyHiker. All rights reserved. No duplication without permission.

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One Comment Add yours

  1. julianne0919 says:

    Awesome! Just drove past here today.

    Like

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